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Working Together to Improve Services

first_imgThirteen projects across the province are receiving grants to provide victims of sexual violence with the support they need. “We need to make sure survivors and their families can get the help they need no matter where they live,” said Marilyn More, Minister responsible for the Status of Women. “These approved projects are taking a collaborative and coordinated approach to address sexual violence across the province. They are an important step to help prevent and address sexual violence. “We know, and have heard that there are gaps in services for victims of sexual violence. Today’s funding will help community organizations strengthen their network to improve sexual assault services and provide a better future for families through projects like these.” In May, the province announced $200,000 in grants to support collaboration between organizations that address sexual violence. Organizations can use funding to expand upon partnerships, or to support proposals for potential demonstration projects being announced in September. “Today’s project funding will enable us to build more robust collaborative linkages with existing services for victims,” said Paula Marshall, executive director of the Mi’kmaw Legal Support Network, Eskasoni office. “This is a positive step to help us move from passively serving aboriginal women to a more active and engaged stance.” The grants are part of the province’s $1.1 million investment to address sexual violence. It builds upon the emergency funding some community organizations received in May, when they experienced an increase demand for their services. “Over the past three months there has been a collective determination to do things differently – and it’s happening,” said Ms. More. “From working differently together to ensuring services are developed in under-served areas, we are helping more survivors get support and we are taking steps to help change the culture around this issue, recognizing we still have a long way to go to end sexual violence.” More information, visit http://novascotia.ca.last_img read more

Toshiba says Westinghouse files for bankruptcy protection

by Yuri Kageyama, The Associated Press Posted Mar 29, 2017 6:33 am MDT Last Updated Mar 30, 2017 at 3:40 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Toshiba says Westinghouse files for bankruptcy protection TOKYO – Japan’s embattled Toshiba Corp. said Wednesday that its U.S. nuclear unit Westinghouse Electric Co. has filed for bankruptcy protection, marking a key step in its struggles to stop the flow of massive red ink.Toshiba said in a statement that it filed the Chapter 11 petition in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court of New York. The move had been largely expected.Toshiba has said it’s expecting a loss of 500 billion yen ($4.3 billion) for April-December of last year, including a 712.5 billion yen ($6.2 billion) hit from its embattled nuclear business. It said Wednesday that it was working out revised numbers, and warned that the loss for the fiscal year may grow to 1 trillion yen ($9 billion).Toshiba acquired Westinghouse in 2006 with much fanfare, making nuclear power an important part of its business strategy.After the March 2011 nuclear disaster in Fukushima, costs of the business have ballooned because of growing safety concerns and regulations, and a souring of sentiment toward nuclear power in some countries, such as Germany.Toshiba has been eager to get Westinghouse off its books to improve its plight, and it said it would do just that from this fiscal year. It has said earlier it wants to sell Westinghouse. Toshiba said Westinghouse had racked up debt of $9.8 billion.Toshiba President Satoshi Tsunakawa said the move was aimed at “shutting out risks from the overseas nuclear business.”“We want to make this our first step toward recovering our solid business,” he told reporters after the announcement.Toshiba reiterated its view that at the root of the problem was the acquisition of U.S. nuclear construction company CB&I Stone and Webster. It declined comment on possible future partners in the rehabilitation of Westinghouse.Toshiba, which has been unable to report its financial results as required, postponing it into next month, said it would monitor the rehabilitation proceedings and disclose information as quickly as possible.Its chairman has resigned to take responsibility for the company’s troubles.Auditors questioned Toshiba’s latest reporting on the acquisition of CB&I Stone & Webster after a whistleblower, an employee at Westinghouse, wrote a letter to the Westinghouse president.The company’s reputation has also been tarnished in recent years by a scandal over the doctoring of accounting books to meet unrealistic profit targets.Satoshi Ogasawara, who has written a book about Toshiba’s systematically falsifying financial results, says executives knew of the problems for years but kept procrastinating, hoping against hope that things would get better and they would be able to avoid blame. But things just got worse.“Buying Westinghouse was the beginning of the end,” he said. “But even before that, there was a dubious corporate culture.”Toshiba already faced problems in its personal computer business amid competition from Dell, Lenovo and HP. The drop of oil prices combined with the Three Mile Island and Fukushima accidents made nuclear power less lucrative, and plant construction kept getting stonewalled, said Ogasawara. He believes many executives responsible for the mess are still at Toshiba, without being held responsible.The company has said it will no longer take on new reactor construction projects and will focus on maintaining the reactors it already has. But it is also involved in the decommissioning of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, which suffered multiple meltdowns after the March 2011 tsunami.Toshiba has sold off so many parts of its once prized operations, such as computer chips and household appliances, it has little left but its infrastructure business.___Follow Yuri Kageyama on Twitter at https://twitter.com/yurikageyamaHer work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/content/yuri-kageyama Toshiba Corp. President Satoshi Tsunakawa bows during a press conference at the company’s headquarters in Tokyo, Wednesday, March 29, 2017. Japan’s embattled Toshiba said Wednesday that its U.S. nuclear unit Westinghouse Electric Co. has filed for bankruptcy protection. Toshiba said in a statement that it filed the chapter 11 petition in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court of New York. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi) read more

On Day Against Drug Abuse Ban calls for effective compassionate global response

“I call on countries and communities to continue to improve the lives of everyone blighted by drug abuse by integrating security and public safety with a heightened focus on health, human rights, and sustainable development,” said the UN chief in his message on the Day. The illicit trade in drugs fosters transnational organized crime networks, systemic corruption and widespread violence. It is also a major public health menace. Millions of people are directly affected, especially the poor, vulnerable women and children, and those living in fragile communities. At the special session of the UN General Assembly on the World Drug Problem, held in April, tangible progress was made in promoting alternatives to incarceration, fortifying human rights commitments, strengthening the focus on illicit financial proceeds, and tackling corruption. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) also informed the deliberations at the special session. Goal 3 calls on countries to strengthen the prevention and treatment of narcotic drug abuse, end AIDS and combat hepatitis. Goal 16 is designed to help to build peaceful, just and inclusive societies and institutions that can address illicit drugs, crime, corruption and terrorism. This year, the Day is marked by the launch of the ‘Listen First’ initiative to increase support for prevention of drug use. Based on science, listening to children and youth is the first step to help them grow healthy and safe, and it is thus an effective investment in the well-being of children and youth, their families and their communities. In 1987, the General Assembly decided to observe 26 June as the International Day as an expression of its determination to strengthen action and cooperation to achieve the goal of an international society free of drug abuse. In another message to mark the Day, Yury Fedotov, the Executive Director of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), highlighted that the outcome document adopted at the General Assembly special session stresses a joint commitment to counter the world drug problem, which has helped “generate a global sense of purpose against this threat that menaces millions.” The Executive Director said the document makes a number of concrete recommendations on the way forward, such as exploring alternative measures to conviction or punishment where appropriate; promoting international cooperation; the adoption of key international instruments on organized crime, corruption and terrorism; strengthening criminal justice systems, with a focus on drug prevention and treatment; including HIV and hepatitis; and upholding fundamental human rights. For its part, UNODC’s World Drug Report 2016 advances further understanding of the problem, the Executive Director said. “In alarming detail the report shows a rise in the number of problem drug users from 27 to 29 million people aged 15-64; the disastrous resurgence of heroin in some regions; the use of the ‘Darknet’ for drug trafficking; the appalling loss of life due to overdoses, and the disproportionate impact illicit drugs have on women, among many others challenges,” Mr. Fedotov said. “Today also follows the landmark adoption last September of the 2030 development agenda. The special session gave us the tools and the commitment to fight illicit drugs; but in the 17 Goals we now have the architectural blueprint for appreciating how work against drugs, crime and corruption fits into the much wider work of sustainable development,” he added. Mr. Fedotov noted that one of the key recommendations of this year’s report is that achieving sustainable development and countering the world drug problem must not exist as “distant cousins.” Illicit drugs threaten the security and health of people, while weakening both communities and institutions. If targets are to be achieved under Goal 3 on health, and Goal 16, on peaceful societies, as well as many other goals, drug-related development initiatives should be mainstreamed into general development efforts, he emphasized. read more