Relative Content

mkqhgqvom

Wilmer Valderrama Hosts Kids In Need Of Defense KIND Benefit at BOLON

first_imgKIND Los Angeles, an exclusive cocktail reception benefitting Kids In Need Of Defense (KIND), was hosted by Wilmer Valderrama at the new BOLON Los Angeles showroom and historic Helms Design Center in Culver City on Saturday, August 4.Elle McLemore , Wilmer Valderrama and Zuri Adele Credit/Copyright: Nina Prommer/KINDKIND Los Angeles introduced the LA entertainment, design and philanthropic communities to KIND. The event highlighted KIND’s work protecting and defending immigrant children suffering in detention centers during the current border crisis. KIND provides high quality pro bono legal representation to immigrant children separated from their parents and helps to reunite children with their parents and families.Presented by BOLON and BOOM Events, the cocktail party was hosted by actor and activist Wilmer Valderrama who participated in a special presentation with KIND President Wendy Young; Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Sonia Nazario; and Alejandra Valdez, a teenage former KIND client originally from El Salvador. Guests enjoyed the beautiful atmosphere of BOLON’s spectacular new Los Angeles showroom while learning about KIND and how they are addressing the family separation crisis.Among the notable guests in attendance were Zuri Adele (Freeform’s upcoming “Good Trouble”), Lana Condor (Netflix’s upcoming “To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before”), Bryan Craig (ABC’s upcoming “Grand Hotel”), Elle McLemore (upcoming film “American Dresser”), Sonia Nazario (Pulitzer Prize winner), Goya Robles (“Get Shorty”), Adam Rodriguez (“Criminal Minds”), Gabrielle Ruiz (“Crazy Ex-Girlfriend”), Alicia Sanz (“From Dusk Till Dawn”), Pallavi Sastry (“Blue Bloods”), Azie Tesfai (“Jane The Virgin”), Diego Tinoco (“On My Block”), Alejandra Valdez (former KIND client), Lincoln Younes (ABC’s upcoming “Grand Hotel”), Wendy Young (KIND President), Zeeko Zaki (CBS’s upcoming “F.B.I.”) and more.KIND LOS ANGELES was generously sponsored by BOLON, BOOM events, Helms Design Center, Michael Hollingsworth Catering, Stanley’s Wet Goods and HINT Waters.last_img read more

Because of Delays Angry Protesters Block Train at Rabat Station

Rabat – Angry passengers have blocked tracks at the Temara Station near Rabat on Thursday in protest against repeated delays and lack of communication, Alyaoum24 reported.Irked by the excessive delays in the arrival of trains, angry commuters stood on the lines due to which the entire traffic was halted.The driver of train number 105 is alleged to have attempted to run over a large number of passengers who occupied the tracks to show their “discontent” with the regular delays of the ONCF, Morocco’s national railway operator.

Florida governor signs bill for foreign drug importation

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — Floridians could eventually gain access to cheaper prescription drugs from Canada and other foreign countries under legislation signed into law Tuesday by Gov. Ron DeSantis, if the federal government gives it a green light.The Republican governor signed the bill in The Villages, home to one of the state’s largest retirement-age communities. The U.S. overall spends 30% to 190% more on prescription drugs than other developed countries and pays up to 174% more for the same prescription drug, according to a legislative bill analysis.The legislation allows creation of two prescription drug importation programs subject to strict regulation: one involving importing drugs from Canada and a second calling for drugs to be brought in from unspecified other countries to be chosen later.DeSantis said President Donald Trump supports the initiative and has directed the U.S. Health and Human Services Department to approve it. If that happens, the plan would come back to the Florida Legislature for final enactment and funding possibly next year.“The American people want to see change,” DeSantis said. “I don’t think they want to see us paying more than everybody else in the entire world.”The governor appeared at a news conference with House Speaker Jose Oliva, a Miami Lakes Republican who pushed for the bill, and other sponsors including Republican Sen. Aaron Bean of Jacksonville. Oliva said lobbying was intense from the pharmaceutical industry and other groups opposed to the measure.“We were going up against the greatest force in America, which is Big Pharma,” the speaker said. “We were able to get it done the right way.”Indeed, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America issued a statement moments after the event ended condemning the measure and saying it jeopardizes Floridians’ health by possibly allowing contaminated, counterfeit and ineffective prescription drugs into the marketplace.“As we’ve warned time and time again, this reckless policy could have a devastating impact on patient safety,” said Priscilla VanderVeer, vice-president of the organization. “Today is a sad day for Floridians.”Bean, however, said sufficient safeguards are built into the plan to ensure any drugs from Canada or other countries are safe and effective. He said the pharmaceutical industry doesn’t want U.S. drug prices to go down.“They tried to scare you. They love that you pay the highest drug prices on the planet,” he said.Still, there are questions about whether Canada would permit its lower-cost drugs to be sold in the U.S. in the first place and how much a new regulatory framework for foreign drugs might cost Florida taxpayers.One of the new programs is for state-funded entities such as Medicaid and the prison system and the other involves importing drugs to be sold directly to consumers through pharmacies. The second faces more federal government hurdles in order to become law.Vermont last year became the first state in the nation to enact a prescription-drug importation law but it has not submitted an application to the federal health agency. Congress in 2003 enacted a law permitting states to import drugs subject to federal approval, but none have done so yet._____Follow Curt Anderson on Twitter: http://twitter.com/MiamicurtCurt Anderson, The Associated Press read more

More women in Cambodia turning to sex trade amid financial crisis –

The report, prepared by the UN Inter-Agency Project on Human Trafficking (UNIAP), is based on research conducted in April and May involving 357 women and girls aged between 15 and 49 currently working in the entertainment sector of the capital, Phnom Penh, including in brothels, karaoke bars and massage parlours. “The objective of this research was to measure increases in human trafficking and exploitation in Cambodia as a result of the financial crisis, specifically, the trafficking of women and girls into the entertainment sector,” UNIAP says in a news release issued yesterday.The report shows that during the crisis, women have entered the sex trade coming from situations where there have been declining working conditions, such as in the garment sector, where they experienced long working hours and low pay.The most common reason given by the women and girls for entering the sex trade was “difficult family circumstances,” followed by “easily earn a lot of money, in good working conditions.”Most massage parlour workers, 57 per cent, found their jobs independently, while 46 per cent of karaoke workers found theirs through friends. Nearly 80 per cent of direct sex workers also found their jobs on their own. The report also found that 58 per cent of women who entered the entertainment sector before the crisis were in debt, while the same was true of 42 per cent who entered after the crisis. “It could be assumed that the shift in women turning from money lenders to sex establishment bosses for loans may lead to more women being vulnerable to the control tactics and violence that are often thought to be associated with debt bondage,” states UNIAP.However, it was debts to money lenders, and not debt bondage, that was found to be significantly associated with the worst violence and worst restrictions on freedoms among those surveyed.The report recommends strengthening social safety nets, designed to meet the needs of families with women who are vulnerable to exploitation and degrading working conditions, as well as linking women who want jobs featuring better working conditions with alternative livelihood training and job placement assistance.Also recommended is the use of targeted awareness raising and outreach to provide specific, clear information to people who may be vulnerable, for example on how to access social services and training that will lead to jobs, the risks of using moneylenders, and how to qualify for and access safer sources of loans and credit. 21 July 2009The global financial crisis has led to signs of an increase in Cambodian women entering the sex trade, says a new United Nations report, which recommends strengthening social safety nets and improving job training and placement to help women avoid such dangerous and exploitative work. read more

NS opens door to new energy ventures among worlds highest tides in

HALIFAX — Nova Scotia has opened the door to small tidal technology ventures in the Bay of Fundy, giving them broad access to test their projects amid the world’s highest tides.Energy Minister Geoff MacLellan announced legislative changes Thursday that will allow tidal energy developers to sell the electricity their turbines generate, and help bring it to market faster.MacLellan said the step is needed in an industry where the technology is evolving rapidly, and will attract new ventures and foster further research in the Bay of Fundy.“Today we are creating a new pathway to develop these turbines,” he said of amendments to the Marine Renewable-energy Act.MacLellan said his department would allow five-year demonstration permits of up to five megawatts.“(The changes) would give companies the ability to sell the electricity they generate at a lower price than the current developmental tidal feed-in tariffs. This will foster innovation by allowing industry to assess new lower cost devices without long-term commitments and without driving up power rates.”No more than 10 megawatts of total power would be authorized, and MacLellan said operators would still be required to have all needed permits and environmental approvals.The province approved a test project at the Fundy Ocean Research Centre near Parrsboro, N.S., in June of last year.The Cape Sharp Tidal turbine, which can generate enough electricity to supply only 500 homes, is about five storeys tall and was anchored on the seabed at the mouth of a five-kilometre-wide channel near Parrsboro, where the crushing currents can travel at five metres per second.A group of fishermen said it threatened a rich breeding ground for lobster, groundfish and scallops, but lost a legal challenge this past April in Nova Scotia Supreme Court.MacLellan was asked Thursday whether opening up the bay to further widespread testing would be seen as a provocative move.“We would hope that’s not the case,” he said. “There’s no consideration that we would haphazardly advance these permits and the ability for tidal players to go anywhere … and cause environmental damage.”Elisa Obermann, executive director of the industry group Marine Renewables Canada, said allowing companies to patch into the grid is key.“Being able to connect to the grid is a key part in maturing the technologies and ensuring that they are going to be efficient and effective,” said Obermann.She said the Bay of Fundy is recognized as “the place” for tidal energy development in the world. read more

Canam reinstates dividend as Q3 profit surges to 10 million on higher

Canam reinstates dividend as Q3 profit surges to $10 million on higher revenues by Ross Marowits, The Canadian Press Posted Oct 23, 2013 3:52 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email MONTREAL – Canam Group is reinstating its quarterly dividend after the fabricator of steel structures for the construction industry saw profits surge to $10 million in the third quarter on a strong boost in revenue.The Quebec-based company earned 24 cents per share for the period ended Sept. 28, compared with 15 cents a year earlier when net income was $6.5 million.Sales increased nearly 26 per cent to $285 million, mainly due to higher light structural steel sales.Canam (TSX:CAM) says improved conditions will allow it to pay a dividend for the first time since 2011 without sacrificing its ability to invest and take advantage of business opportunities. The four cents per share dividend will be paid Jan. 3 to shareholders of record on Dec. 15. It represents a yield of 1.5 per cent.The strong results caused the company’s shares to close at their highest level in more than five years. On the Toronto Stock Exchange, they gained 60 cents, or 5.7 per cent, to $11.10 in Wednesday trading.The company said the higher profit was due to increased revenues and improved profit margins in its three operating segments — buildings, structural steel and bridges.“Both the volume and quality of the orders constitute encouraging signs,” said president and CEO Marc Dutil. “Our backlog reflects the gradual improvement seen in the heavy structural steel market.”Canam’s backlog of orders was $636 million up from $619 million as of June 29, 2013. Its net debt, excluding convertible debentures, was $147.6 million, $31.6 million lower than Dec. 31.Sara O’Brien of RBC Capital Markets said the results beat her estimates and the 19 cents per share consensus of analysts.“We view these results as positive given the significant lift in sales,” she wrote in a report.Canam Group is the largest fabricator of steel components in North America and employs 3,500 people in Canada, the United States, Romania, India and Hong Kong. read more

Week In Westminster – Week ending Friday 28 October 2011

DOWNLOADChampions sought for ‘Make it in Great Britain’ campaignVince Cable delivers speech on industrial policyApprenticeship ‘starts’ up 50% on previous year£4.2 million funding increase for low carbon vehicles in ScotlandConcerns over MOT change highlighted in ParliamentWeek aheadClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)

Overcast skies threaten to block views of partial solar eclipse in UK

first_imgIf you want to see a partial solar #eclipse in the UK, then about 10% of the sun will be obscured at around 8pm. Clear skies though?… pic.twitter.com/FjZviOAXb8— Simon King (@SimonOKing) August 21, 2017 Gloomy skies are set to stop Britons seeing a partial solar eclipse this evening, forecasters have warned.Just before sunset the moon will appear to take a “bite” out of the sun in a phenomenon lasting roughly 40 minutes.The mid-point will occur at different times around the UK, but overcast weather is likely to obscure the spectacle for most, the Met Office said.The movement of the moon between the Earth and sun will produce a much more dramatic event in the US, where a total eclipse will turn day to night for two minutes. “Anywhere in the east, including London, won’t see anything because it will just be clouded over; also Scotland and Northern Ireland.” Who needs the moon? UK experiences it’s own #solareclipse as clouds block out sun pic.twitter.com/gqWcwwmBjs— Gurjit Dehl (@GurjitDehl) August 21, 2017 Due to the partial eclipse occurring near sunset, there is unlikely to be an observable reduction in light, he added.For observers in Edinburgh, the peak of the eclipse is due to be at 7.58pm and for those in Cardiff at 8.05pm.Millions of Americans are gathering along a stretch from Oregon to South Carolina to watch the spectacle – the first total solar eclipse to sweep coast to coast across the US in 99 years.Southern-most Illinois will have the longest period of darkness at two minutes and 44 seconds. The UK is able to see an eclipse today around 8pm. No one will notice, as its August and we’re inevitably going to be clouded over.— Barney (@KieBarnden) August 21, 2017 On British shores, only south-west England and South Wales are expected to have any chance of witnessing the moment through a break in the cloud.Met Office forecaster Martin Bowles said: “It doesn’t look very promising.”It is only going to be about 4% of the sun which will be blotted out, so even if it is perfect weather conditions you won’t see a lot.”From a meteorological point of view it is not looking very good because of the cloud – most people won’t be able to see a thing.”There will be some breaks in the cloud in the south-west of the country – South Wales and south-west England – there will be enough breaks that people who are looking specifically might be able to see a little chip out of the corner of the sun. It is expected to be the most observed and most photographed eclipse in history.Up to five solar eclipses occur each year, but each one is visible only within a limited band across the Earth’s surface where the moon’s shadow happens to fall.The Royal Astronomical Society warned anyone hoping to catch the phenomenon not to look directly at the sun. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Poll Have you started your Christmas shopping

first_imgIT IS EXACTLY seven weeks until Christmas Day.That means you have 49 days to make sure there are gifts wrapped under the tree when the family wakes up.How are you doing with that?Today we want to know: Have you started your Christmas shopping? No (3935) Poll Results: Yes, I’ve started (1555)center_img Yes, AND I’m finished *smug* (191) Yes, AND I’m finished *smug*Yes, I’ve startedNoVotelast_img

Labour has been given a good smacking by the electorate Howlin

first_img Labour anxious for their Lord Mayor Oisin Quinn, after tallies show low support in his own area of Ranelagh #ie14 #ievote— Juno McEnroe (@Junomaco) May 24, 2014 GOING BY RTÉ’S exit poll, the Labour party received seven per cent of the national vote in this years local election. That is down by over seven per cent on the 2009 vote.Compared to the 2011 general election they are down by even further when they received 19 per cent of the popular vote.Speaking on RTÉ this morning, Labour’s Minster for Public Expenditure Brendan Howlin has already conceded that Labour has been ‘given a good smacking’ by the electorate.He said that the party had been “bracing itself” for a bad result but insisted that people understood that harsh measures had to be introduced. He insisted that he himself is not “pro-austerity” but that Government policies were forced upon them.Labour’s former national organiser Pat Magnier was also speaking on the same programme and said that it was obvious that there has been a ‘strong trend against the party’.Despite this he felt that Labour would stay the course in Government after going into coalition three years ago: Labour source describes the tallies so far in Dublin as “a f**king disaster”.— Hugh O’Connell (@oconnellhugh) May 24, 2014 LIVEBLOG: Local election results 2014 >Read: Early tallies put the Socialist Party in the lead in Dublin West by-election > Source: Hugh O’Connell/Twittercenter_img Labour’s performance in Dublin West also doesn’t look good on early tallies. Party chairman Loraine Mulligan was never expected to take the seat but she is polling under six per cent so far and currently trails Green Party candidate Roderic O’Gorman.There are also very concerns about Labour’s sitting Lord Mayor Oisin Quinn according to a number of reports. Source: Juno McEnroe/Twitter There was nothing in this for Labour Party but pain, but there was a responsibility to give stability among this extraordinary crisis.last_img read more

Milwaukees SelfHeating Jacket is Ready for Winter

first_imgIf you’re like most of us, the weather is just starting to get seriously cold where you are and it’s past time to break out the cold weather gear. If you live in Minneapolis and you’re dealing with blizzard conditions, you can’t leave the house without it. With Milwaukee’s (the tool company, not the city) new M12 Heated Jacket, you can confidently walk outside knowing that you’ll be able to stay warm. The jacket features three sewn-in carbon fiber heating plates that will keep you warm without scorching your skin, and four independent heat settings on a touch-sensitive controller that you can adjust based on the temperature outside. Along with the jacket you get an 8-hour rechargeable battery that will keep you nice and toasty while you’re outside shoveling snow or warming up the car.last_img read more

Around 400000 construction staff to receive twoyear pay deal

first_imgApproximately 400,000 construction employees who operate under the Construction Industry Joint Council (CIJC) agreement will receive a two-year pay deal, effective from Monday 25 June 2018.The pay deal, which was agreed by trade unions Unite and the GMB, will see employees receive a 3.2% pay increase as of 25 June 2018. This will take the minimum hourly rates of pay for craft workers, such as carpenters, bricklayers and painters, to £12.31 an hour and improve the minimum rate of pay for labourers to £9.26 an hour. Pay will increase by a further 2.9% from Monday 24 June 2019.The agreed pay deal will also see employees’ travel allowance increase in line with the percentage rise in pay rates, the tax-free fare allowance rise in line with inflation and lodging allowances increase by 7.8% to £40 a night in 2018. The lodging allowance will additionally increase in line with inflation for 2019.Industry sick pay, which is paid in addition to statutory sick pay, will rise by 6.1% to £130 a week. This will be paid for 13 weeks, compared to the 10 weeks it is currently paid for. The industry death benefit, which is applicable if an employee is killed at work or travelling to and from work, will be increased from £32,000 to £40,000.First year apprentices will also receive a 6.5% pay rise to earn £5.50 an hour.The CIJC is the largest agreement in the construction industry and principally covers employees working in civil engineering, as well as trade roles like carpenters, bricklayers and painters.Jerry Swain, national officer for construction at Unite, said: “This deal is a strong step in the right direction and will give construction [employees] a well-deserved pay increase. The increases in allowances and other benefits underline the value of working under an industrial agreement and being part of collective bargaining arrangements.“Over the next two years we will be working to further strengthen the agreement and ensure that it is brought into line with other agreements in all matters and is seen as relevant on major construction sites. Construction [employees] need to remain vigilant that employers actually pay the agreed pay rates. Too often in construction employers try to boost their profits by failing to pay agreed increases.”Ross Murdoch, national officer at GMB, added: “Given the current climate in the wider construction industry and overall economic climate, this deal is both a recognition of a hard-working, highly-skilled workforce and a demonstration of real commitment to maintaining meaningful joint national industrial agreement.“As further significant construction projects emerge over the next few years, this deal offers genuine hope of retaining the much needed skills for the industry, as well as attracting new apprentices, with the percentage uplift for apprentice rates further reinforcing the importance of this latter point.”last_img read more

MiamiDade animal shelter seeking publics help to save more animals

first_imgDORAL, FLA. (WSVN) – The Miami-Dade Animal Shelter is seeking the community’s help to save more animals.The population is starting to spike at the Miami-Dade Animal Services Pet Adoption & Protection Center, at 3599 NW 79th Ave., in Doral.During summertime, said Erik Hofmeyer, the shelter’s spokesperson, an average of 86 animals enter the shelter each day.Hofmeyer said, “This wave of animals coming in week after week, we’re doing our best to find adoptions and also work with the community to help overcome the over-population problem by offering affordable spay and neuter services.”The total adoption cost covers sterilization, vaccines, a license and a microchip.The shelter’s staff said a huge way to help is through their foster program, which provides a temporary home for a pet while creating a space for another pet coming into the shelter.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

Cyclist killed in Miami Beach hitandrun

first_imgMIAMI BEACH, FLA. (WSVN) – Miami Beach Police are searching for the driver responsible for a hit-and-run collision that resulted in a cyclist’s death.Investigators said a driver speeding on the shoulder and bicycle lane of the MacArthur Causeway struck and killed the victim, at around 1:20 a.m., Saturday.The driver had been traveling along the westbound lanes, according to police.Investigators said they have since found the car believed to be involved and identified a person of interest.The MacArthur Causeway was temporarily closed but has since reopened.Officials have not released the names of the victim or the person of interest.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img

Google How ‘needlefree’ blooddrawing watch would work

first_imgClose Speculation that Googles next piece of wearable technology will be a blood-drawing smartwatch that helps diabetics monitor blood-sugar levels is growing, after the tech giant filed a patent application for the device. The gadget described in the patent works by pricking the finger and drawing blood without using a needle.A detachable chamber is placed on top of a fingertip and a gas-powered microparticle is blasted through it towards the skin, according to Googles application filed with the US Patent and Trademark Office. The microparticle – which could be as small as 10 microns, or 10 millionths of a metre – pierces the skin and the device draws a small vial of blood into a pressurised chamber.Now containing a blood sample, the device is reattached to the watch, which could be used to measure glucose levels. Google declined to confirm if the invention would be used to create a new product.We hold patents on a variety of ideas – some of those ideas later mature into real products or services, some dont, a Google spokesperson told The Verge. Prospective product announcements should not necessarily be inferred from our patents.Diabetics must monitor blood sugar levels several times a day to avoid complications from the disease, often by drawing blood samples with a needle from a fingertip.last_img read more

Three Resources For Voters Who Encounter Problems At The Polls

first_imgELECTION PROTECTION (coalition of non-profits focused on voter protection, headed by the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law)866-OUR-VOTE (866-687-8683, English)888-VE-Y-VOTA (888-839-8682, Spanish)888-API-VOTE (888-274-8683, Mandarin, Cantonese, Vietnamese, Korean, Hindi, Urdu, Bengali, and Tagalog) TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE OFFICEPhone:  1-800-252-8683 COUNTY ELECTION OFFICIALSHarris County, 713-755-8683Houston Public Media’s Coverage of Election 2016Fort Bend County, 281-341-8670Montgomery County, 936-539-7843Brazoria County, 979-864-1662Galveston County, 409-770-5108Liberty County, 936-366-4676Waller County, 979-826-7643Chambers County, 409-267-2421Austin County, 979-865-8633center_img Sharelast_img

Flickr limits free version to 1000 photos

first_imgFlickr limits free version to 1000 photos by Martin Brinkmann on November 03, 2018 in Music and Video – 42 commentsFlickr announced plans to limit free accounts of the photo community severely in the coming months.The photo hosting service offered 1 Terabyte of photo storage to free users since 2013. Yahoo, which was acquired by Verizon in 2016, sold Flickr to SmugMug in 2018.Specifics of the deal were not disclosed but SmugMug revealed back then that it would continue to support free accounts on the site and would not move or change photos.The first major change after the acquisition date was announced on November 1, 2018. The press release, released by Flickr, highlights changes to Pro and Free accounts on Flickr.Flickr Pro customers get more for the yearly subscription fee that they pay to Flickr while free customers will face serious limitations.Flickr users don’t need a Yahoo account anymore to use Flickr from January 2019 on.New Pro account featuresFlickr Pro accounts get unlimited storage and an advertisement-free experience on the site.  Pro customers will get access to the following features as of today or in the near future as well:Priority support (now).Advanced states on mobile (November).More partner discounts (November).Priority exposure in the new version of Explore (early 2019).Resolution upgrade to support 5k (early 2019).Video playtime upgrade to 10 minutes from 3 (early 2019).Free accounts are downsizedFlickr will downsize all free accounts to a limit of 1000 photos or videos. The media can be of any size according to the press release. Free accounts won’t get 1 Terabyte of online storage for media anymore.The change impacts existing customers on the site. Any account that is over the 1000 photo limit will have photos removed from the site that are in excess of the limit.Free members with more than 1,000 photos or videos uploaded to Flickr have until Tuesday, January 8, 2019, to upgrade to Pro or download content over the limit. After January 8, 2019, members over the limit will no longer be able to upload new photos to Flickr.After February 5, 2019, free accounts that contain over 1,000 photos or videos will have content actively deleted — starting from oldest to newest date uploaded — to meet the new limit.Free users of Flick have until February 5, 2019 to make a decision. The options are:Upgrade to a Pro account for 30% off in the first year to get unlimited storage and other Pro benefits.Download excess photos or all photos before they are deleted.Do nothing and have Flickr delete photos automatically that exceed the limit.The reasoning behind the changeA blog post was published on the official Flickr blog on the same day that provides an explanation for the change:The free 1 Terabyte offer attracted many users who were only interested in free storage and not community interaction. The tone of the site changed.SmugMug wants to run Flickr on subscription revenue and not rely on revenue generated by advertisement.Sending the wrong signal that storage and Flickr is not worth paying for.The 1000 photo limit was decided upon after careful examination of current use scenarios on Twitter. Most Pro customers have more than 1000 photos and videos uploaded to Flickr while the vast majority of free users, 97% according to Flickr, have fewer than 1000 photos or videos stored on Flickr.Closing WordsIt may not be a popular opinion, but I understand Flickr’s / SmugMug’s motivation for the change. Yahoo’s business model relied on data and advertising; the more users a service had the better for advertising. SmugMug wants to shift the business model to subscriptions.What I can’t agree with is how the situation is handled. Flickr could have made a different decision on how to proceed with the shift:Make the change only for new accounts on the site and not existing ones.Offer free users a bigger discount or even 6/12 months free to test Pro features.The move will displease free users who exceed the 1000 photo limit, 3% according to Flickr of the entire free user population, and may also displease free users who have not hit the limit but dislike the limitation nevertheless.Now You: What is your take on the announced change? Are you affected?SummaryArticle NameFlickr limits free version to 1000 photosDescriptionFlickr announced plans to limit free accounts of the photo community severely in the coming months.Author Martin BrinkmannPublisher Ghacks Technology NewsLogo Advertisementlast_img read more

Atlantic earthquake felt in state of Quintana Roo

first_imgThe movement caused a slight shake in the city of Chetumal and its surrounding area. Protección Civil of Quintana Roo released an alert about the recorded movement. The quake, which was recorded in the Atlantic Ocean, was felt by Chetumal residents around 2:43 a.m. Sunday. Protección Civil of Quintana Roo says the earthquake was a magnitude of 5.1 and 10 kilometers deep with its epicenter 66 kilometers northwest of Coxen Hole, Honduras. Although no damage was reported, the Sistema Estatal de Protección Civil en Quintana Roo did carry out inspections of some Chetumal buildings. Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window) “Some seismic vibrations felt very light in some points of Quintana Roo without affecting the state geography. It is important to keep informed through official means,” they reported across social media. center_img Chetumal, Q.R. — An earthquake recorded off the northern coast of Honduras was felt by residents in the state’s capital city of Chetumal. last_img read more

Financial Benefits of Philips DuraDiagnost

first_imgFind more news and videos from AAPM. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Technology Reports View all 9 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Information Technology View all 220 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Discover how Philips is helping community hospitals maximize value in limited workspaces. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 2:20Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -2:20 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Women’s Health View all 62 items Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Sponsored Content | Videos | Radiology Imaging | December 08, 2015 Financial Benefits of Philips DuraDiagnost RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Conference Coverage View all 396 items Find more SCCT news and videoscenter_img Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Recent Videos View all 606 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Find more SCCT news and videos Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Radiology Imaging View all 288 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

MSC welcomes new MSC Bellissima at starstudded naming ceremony

first_img Posted by Tags: MSC Bellissima, MSC Cruises MSC welcomes new MSC Bellissima at star-studded naming ceremony << Previous PostNext Post >> Travelweek Group center_img SOUTHAMPTON — MSC Cruises’ new flagship – MSC Bellissima – has been officially named at a traditional maritime naming ceremony in the port of Southampton.Featuring a star-studded lineup of entertainers as well as several key travel partners, the ceremony took place on March 2 and was hosted by English TV presenter Holly Willoughby. Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee Nile Rodgers performed his most popular hits while world-famous tenor Andrea Bocelli and Matteo Bocelli sang a duet to kickstart the event. The event also included a special performance from Cirque du Soleil at Sea, marking the first time that Cirque has performed at the launch of a ship.MSC Cruises’ Godmother Sophia Lauren was also on hand to officially name her 14th ship.MSC Godmother Sophia LaurenMSC Bellissima is the second Meraviglia class ship to come into service, designed as a ship for all seasons and featuring the latest guest-centric technology, including the world’s first virtual personal cruise assistant, ZOE. The ship will also offer two new Cirque du Soleil at Sea shows, exclusive to MSC Cruises’ guests: Syma and Varélia.Cirque du Soleil at SeaOther key highlights of the ship include 12 dining venues and more than 20 bars and lounges, including the Jean-Philippe Maury’s Chocolate & Café, which is dedicated entirely to elegant chocolate creations and desserts. There’s also a dedicated family deck area featuring kids activities and services from LEGO and Chicco, as well as the MSC Yacht Club, which spans three decks and offers butler service round-the-clock.More news:  Honolulu authorities investigate arsons at 3 Waikiki hotels; no injuries reportedThe Bellissima is also home to the longest LED Sky Screen at Sea, spanning 262 feet, a Mediterranean-style promenade, and 10 different types of staterooms to choose from. And just like its sister ship MSC Meraviglia, MSC Bellissima is fitted with a number of environmental features to reduce its footprint, including an exhaust gas cleaning system for cleaner emissions, smart heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems, and LED lighting and smart devices to conserve energy.MSC Bellissima Main CeremonyThe ship will spend its inaugural season in the Mediterranean with seven-night cruises before moving to the Emirates for Winter 2019/2010. Following that it will be deployed in Asia in 2020. Share Tuesday, March 5, 2019 last_img read more