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Lesia Tsurenko upsets 2nd-seeded Naomi Osaka to reach Brisbane final

first_imgLesia Tsurenko of Ukraine plays a shot during her semi-final match against Naomi Osaka of Japan at the Brisbane International tennis tournament in Brisbane, Australia, Saturday, Jan. 5, 2019. (AP Photo/Tertius Pickard)BRISBANE, Australia — She’s ranked No. 5 in the world, will enter the season-opening major as a reigning Grand Slam champion, and is trying not to sulk.A lot has happened for Naomi Osaka since she beat Serena Williams in the U.S. Open final last September, and she’s still coming to terms with it. Mostly, it’s the expectations.ADVERTISEMENT Roger Federer wins Hopman Cup with Switzerland for record 3rd time He’ll play fourth-seeded Daniil Medvedev, a 7-6 (6), 6-2 winner over Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, in Sunday’s final, where he’s hoping to claim his first title since Memphis in 2016.Tsurenko is 4-0 in finals, and is hoping to extend that streak when she takes on No. 5-seeded Karolina Pliskova, who beat Donna Vekic 6-3, 6-4 in the night semifinal.Tsurenko had lost both previous encounters to Osaka, including their U.S. Open quarterfinal.From 15-40 down in the ninth, Osaka saved two match points with aces, got the advantage with an audacious drop shot and then held with an ace to ensure Tsurenko had to serve out.Tsurenko went on the attack, earned another two match points with a volley winner and clinched it with the second of those.She has grown in confidence since her trip to the U.S. Open quarterfinals, and is playing with more aggression.“I don’t want to say that this was my best tennis, but it was quite a high level,” Tsurenko said. “I feel I can kind of handle every kind of pressure on court now, even when someone like Naomi is playing really strong.”Osaka is having to deal with different expectations now.“Before, I would just be nervous to be there in a way, and now I feel nervous because I think I should win … and I feel like people expect me to win,” she said. “So that’s like an added amount of nerves. But, I mean, I feel like I’m getting used to it.”Osaka will continue her preparations for the Australian Open, which starts Jan. 14 in Melbourne, with an emphasis on trying to not to sulk when things are going wrong. Osaka kicked the air at one point and dropped her racket to the court after missing another, before visibly questioning how she could be getting it so wrong when her forehand skewed wide on game point.“I was sulking a little bit, and like there are moments that I tried not to do that. But then the ball wouldn’t go in, and then I would go back to being like childish and stuff,” Osaka said. “So I think like that was sort of my main problem today.“I feel like last year I did a lot of that, and I’m trying to change it more, and I think I have — like toward the end of last year. Hopefully this isn’t like a recurring thing.”Japanese flags were still waving in the crowd at Pat Rafter Arena for the next match, when No. 2-seeded Kei Nishikori defeated Jeremy Chardy 6-2, 6-2 in 66 minutes.“Felt very good physically and, tennis-wise, I think it was perfect,” Nishikori said.ADVERTISEMENT In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ LATEST STORIES Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Japeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for Ginebra Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? She has reached the semifinals or better at four of her last five tournaments but hasn’t added another title.A 6-2, 6-4 loss to No. 27-ranked Lesia Tsurenko on Saturday cost second-seeded Osaka a place in the Brisbane International final and a move up to the No. 3 world ranking — which would be a record high for a player from Japan.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back Chriss“If I’m being really frank, I just feel like I had like the worst attitude today,” the 21-year-old Osaka said. “I feel like I didn’t really know how to cope with not playing well.”She dropped two service games in the first and went down an early break in the second but had chances to get even in the sixth game, when she had two break points but committed a string of unforced errors and Tsurenko held for 4-2. Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazilcenter_img Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title MOST READ Philippine Army to acquire MANPADS, self-propelled howitzers “In a way this experience for me is better than winning the tournament, because like this helpless feeling I have, I think today I learned sort of what I … I can do to like improve the situation,” she said. “There aren’t many moments that I feel like that. But, yeah, I feel like today was a very valuable lesson.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Tom Brady most dominant player in AFC championship history Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

WDRH to begin 24-hour operations by year’s end – Lawrence

first_imgAmidst high referral numbersPublic Health Minister Volda Lawrence has said that the West Demerara Regional Hospital (WDRH) is expected to begin operating on a 24-hour basis before the end of the year.The Minister made the revelation in response to heavy criticisms from the Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation (GPHC) in relation to the high number of referrals, especially in the Maternity Unit.At Friday’s opening of the extension to the Maternity Unit of the GPHC, Head of the OBGYN Department, Dr Lucio Pedro, pleaded with the authorities to ensure that the regional hospitals, particularly WDRH, carry their weight.“We beg the regional hospitals to play their part in reducing this (high number of referrals). There were 82 referrals for October from regional hospitals, most of them from the West Demerara. There have been a lot of problems with this institution (WDRH), I understand that they close at 5pm (17:00h), and after that, all patients come to GPHC,” Dr Pedro said.He said the biggest challenge is to decrease the maternal and neonatal mortality rates, in keeping with Goals Four and Five of the Millennium Development Goals. He added that 606 babies have been delivered for the month of October.In response to the pleas, Minister Lawrence said that the MoPH is aware of the issues plaguing the institution.“The last couple of months we have been working at all levels to address these issues; and yes, the West Demerara (Hospital) operates at a lesser level after 4(pm). It is not closed, but it operates at a lower level because we do not have the technical staff, the lab technicians, and the X-ray technicians to work beyond that 8-hour period,” she said.She added that the MoPG has been working with the regional authorities and the Communities Ministry to ensure that the situation is addressed.“Work is being done, and before the end of this year, that hospital would be run on a 24-hour basis. We are working to ensure that we upgrade the primary health care institutions, to ensure that we do not have that high flow of patients being referred to the tertiary institutions,” Lawrence added.She added that the Diamond Diagnostic Centre has extended the creating space to house 5 beds for maternity purposes.“We just concluded consultation with the RDC and the NDC of Grove and Diamond and NDC of Haslington-Golden Grove. They have given consent for the collaboration between the Ministry of Public Health and the RDC to sign a MoU for the upgrading of the Diamond Diagnostic Centre and the CC Nicholson Hospital to regional hospitals,” she said.The MoPH is in the process of rehabilitating a number of hospitals, including the West Demerara Regional Hospital.last_img read more

Elks skate into G.P.

first_imgDivision 7Kyla Wass – 5th – 3 Personal BestsEryn Stickel – 13th – 1 Personal BestDivision 9Nyam Newlove – 4th – 4 Personal BestsMichelle Kalkman – 5th – 3 Personal BestsJoshua Telizyn – 6th – 2 Personal BestsCradlesNicholas Guliov – 3rd Jolea Bilodeau attended a long track competition in Calgary and competed against some of the top skaters in the country. She achieved one personal best for the weekend.Advertisement Fifteen members of the Fort St. John Elks Speed Skating Club travelled to Grande Prairie this weekend for a one-day short-track interclub meet. Skaters faced some unfamiliar but welcome competition as there were clubs from the Peace River area as well as Edmonton, Yellowknife and Lloydminster. Each skater competed in a total of five races with more personal best times recorded. It was a good showing by all skaters. Next competition is in two weeks in Dawson Creek.Results for Grande Prairie are as follows:Division 2Connor Johnson – 11th – 2 Personal Bests- Advertisement -Divison 3Kathryn Stickel – 8thKyle Lyth – 11th – 2 Personal BestsDivision 5Ben Maxfield – 5th – 1 Personal BestJenna Burns – 7th – 2 Personal BestsRenee Kalkman – 11th – 2 Personal BestsDivision 6Rachel Kalkman – 3rd – 1 Personal BestColton Johnson – 5th – 3 Personal BestsMadelyn June – 12th – 1 Personal BestAdvertisement Submittedlast_img read more

Three BC Cabinet Ministers in Fort St. John this week

first_imgMinister of Children and Family Development, Mary Polak will be in town on Monday and Tuesday.  On Tuesday she’ll take part in the annual Nenan Youth & Elders Gathering at Bear Flats Campground. Three BC Cabinet Ministers will visit Fort St. John this week. Colin Hansen, Mary Polak and Bill Bennett will all make a stop in Peace River North next week.  The Minister of Fiance and Deputy Premier be here on Monday and will be meeting with several local groups during his visit.center_img Bennett will spend the entire week in the Northeast as the new Minister of Energy, Mines, and Petroleum Resources.  The Fort St. John Chamber of Commerce will host a dinner for the Minister on Thursday July 22nd at the Pomeroy Hotel.  Tickets are available by calling 250-787-7177 at a cost of $30 for members and $40 for non members. – Advertisement –last_img read more

Incumbents challenged in council race

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! With little more than a week before elections, the race for the city of San Fernando’s council is becoming increasingly heated. Incumbents seeking re-election – Mayor Nury Martinez, Julie Ruelas and Steve Veres – all are fighting to keep their part-time seats amid both praise and criticism. And challengers James L. Lawson, Danitza Pantoja and Ruben Sandoval Jr. are stepping up their campaigns to get into the mix. Lawson, a semi-retired health care consultant, said he thinks the council lacks the organization and management skills that he could bring with his experience working on state and federal health commissions through the years. Lawson also said he would concentrate on boosting economic development, improving the city’s streets and sidewalks, and providing regular maintenance such as tree trimming. “It’s time for (the incumbents) to move on and let other people in the community who are interested in serving (have the opportunity),” Lawson said. “People like myself.” For her part, Martinez cites her effort to bring affordable housing to the area, including the addition of more than 90 senior-housing units. Some of the units were finished last year; the rest are nearing completion. A lifelong resident, she said quality-of-life issues also are important and cited council action after a pit-bull mauling last year. Under her leadership, a community action plan was put into place, and stricter code enforcement of nuisance abatement violations were enforced. A full-time county animal control officer also has been assigned to the area. She said focus on mixed-use facilities also has improved under her leadership, and the council has invested $1.7million in sidewalk and street repairs. “I want to go back and finish the work we started,” Martinez said. Pantoja, a part-time family counselor and behavioral therapist who works with families and autistic children, has served on the city’s parks and recreation commission and Healthy Cities program, and led its Relay for Life and Parade Literacy projects. She said she would work to reduce barriers to business including easing liquor-license restrictions for restaurants opening in the city. “I don’t see what the bad thing is in bringing a restaurant with a liquor license when people are driving through the city to go to other restaurants (in other cities),” Pantoja said. Ruelas, an incumbent and mayor pro tem, said that in her first term she revived the city’s Disaster Council, which has helped boost the city’s response to a disaster or emergency. She also helped establish the Children Youth and Families Advisory Committee, which created a forum for people to speak out on related issues. Ruelas, a child development professor at Mission Community College, said her profession has served her well on the council. “I think because of the fact that I work as an educator and I was a grant writer, that gave me leadership skills to help me become a good council member,” she said. With no political experience, Sandoval’s motto is, “Going back to basics.” He said his campaign is based on a desire to serve a community he loves. “I want to become the public’s servant,” Sandoval said. “Put all personal agendas to rest.” Sandoval, a product safety inspector, said he would like to see more effort to recruit police and would consider a program to help home-grown officers buy homes. “I’ve set goals for myself that I could hopefully achieve in my four years,” he said. “Education, increase our public safety (and) new development. I felt that the community needs to be represented.” In his campaign, incumbent Veres notes his leadership role in building Heritage Park, a site that highlights the contributions of the area’s American Indian, Latino and Japanese residents. The park is set to open next month. He also worked on bringing affordable housing to the area for seniors. An educator and district director for former California Assemblywoman Cindy Monta?ez, Veres said the council needs to finish work on the aquatic center at Cesar Chavez Park and continue to expand on a restaurant row. He said he also would work to bring a movie theater to the Northeast Valley. “That whole Northeast corridor,” Veres said. “There’s not a movie theater, and San Fernando is in quite a unique position to provide that.” rick.coca@dailynews.com (818) 713-3329 last_img read more

Aviatrix, 85, still hooked on adventure

first_imgThe dashing young woman from Reseda was 35 and running way too fast to ever get married. Now, she’s 85 and finally slowing down. Her mind and skills aren’t as sharp as they used to be, Jan told me Friday, and the skies are no place for a woman who isn’t at the top of her game. But there’s a place in Vancouver, Wash. – the Pearson Air Museum – that’s going to give a home to the old plane she’s loved more than any man. It’s in the middle of the Fort Vancouver National Historic Reserve and is the oldest airfield and flying museum in the United States, dating back to 1905. When I talked to the museum curator, Kyle Pearson, he said he couldn’t wait for Jan and Little Yellow Cloud to make it up to the dedication ceremony in early July. “We’re rolling out the red carpet for her,” Pearson said. “This woman’s an aviation pioneer. “Man, what a life she’s had.” Yeah, what a life. She was hooked from that day in 1943 when she walked off the UCLA campus – a 21-year-old junior studying to become a teacher – and saw the billboard. It said the government needed women pilots to test and ferry military aircraft domestically while male pilots fought overseas. “I asked my parents to give me flying lessons, but they couldn’t afford it, so I sold my accordion for $350, hopped in my 1929 Ford with a Tear Drop trailer hooked on back, and drove to Olancha, California,” Jan said. It was the nearest private flying area to Los Angeles during the war, and that $350 bought her 35 hours of flying time – the minimum it took to be considered for the Women’s Airforce Service Pilots, or WASPs. A few months later, Jan was in Sweetwater, Texas, beginning her training before being assigned to Stockton, Calif., as a test pilot for twin-engine planes. When the war ended, the WASPs were disbanded and Jan went back to UCLA to finish her degree, going on to teach in the Los Angeles Unified School District for 41 years. But her heart was always in the skies and by 1955, Jan was ready to start running fast again. “I was beachcombing on Catalina Island at the isthmus, where I always spent two months every summer when school was out,” she says. “It was like leaving the world and going to heaven over there. No telephones, no cars, no nothing but wild goats, pigs, fishing and diving. “The yacht people would get drunk, drop their glasses or wallets overboard, and I’d dive the 40 feet to the bottom to recover them. “They’d give me $5. I survived every summer on abalone and drunk yacht people.” Fishing and diving were great for the young, athletic woman, but she wanted to fly. By 1956, she was tenured in her teaching job and eligible to take a yearlong sabbatical. Her $700-a-month salary would be cut in half, but the way Jan had it penciled out, she could fly around the world on $350 a month. “I spent a month on Catalina planning everything out, and bought Little Yellow Cloud for $4,500 by selling some property I had. “I got maps of the world and all the permits I needed from different countries to be allowed to fly in. I packed up some summer and winter clothes and my dog, Cindy, and we were off. “We left from Van Nuys Airport with a lot of fanfare and a big sendoff from the Civil Air Patrol, which had people looking out for me all the way to New York.” That’s when she got word that her dog would not be welcomed in a few countries, so she shipped Cindy home to her parents in Pasadena. In New York, she had the plane dismantled and shipped overseas to Frankfurt, Germany, for $710 and reassembled on an Air Force base there. “I flew seven times from the top to the bottom of Europe. When it was cold in the north, I flew south. And when it was hot in the south, I flew north. “I was in Arabia when I realized I wasn’t going to make it to Singapore in time to get the plane dismantled and shipped home before school started. “I wrote them a letter saying I was learning so much and was going to be such a better teacher because of this experience, could I have six more weeks? They said yes.” Jan made it to 24 countries, spending a little extra time in Spain, Russia and, of course, Paris, where she met that Frenchman who knew some great restaurants. When she got home, she joined the Ninety-Nines, an international organization of fun-loving, daredevil women pilots whose first president was Amelia Earhart. She and Little Yellow Cloud have traveled the world 50 years together and in early July, accompanied by an instructor friend, Jan will make her last trip with her old plane to its new home in Washington state. “I love her,” Jan said Friday, giving Little Yellow Cloud a kiss. “I do wonder sometimes, though, whatever happened to that Frenchman.” Dennis McCarthy’s column appears Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Sunday. dennis.mccarthy@dailynews.com (818) 713-3749 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! “I kept running too fast to ever get married.” – Jan Wood There was that Frenchman in Paris, though. It was 1956 and Jan Wood was flying solo around the world for a year. The Frenchman came pretty close to stealing her heart. But when Jan had to decide between him or flying off to another country and adventure in Little Yellow Cloud – her vintage Cessna 170 tail dragger, named after an Indian good luck sign – well, he never really did stand much of a chance. last_img read more

Arsene Wenger challenges Arsenal to mount title challenge next season after comfortable Hull win

first_img1 Arsene Wenger Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger challenged his side to run Chelsea close for the Premier League title next season after showcasing their credentials with a comfortable 3-1 victory at Hull.Two goals from Alexis Sanchez and another from Aaron Ramsey completed the damage in a devastating first half performance, with Hull’s consolation coming through Stephen Quinn’s header.Arsenal are 11 games unbeaten after a stellar Premier League run in recent months, and Wenger has implored his players to maintain their consistency to mount a serious challenge next campaign.“Chelsea are worthy winners this season because they have been the most consistent team of all. Let’s finish the season well, prepare well for next season and give them a good fight,” said the Gunners’ boss.“I’m always optimistic. In our job, if you are pessimistic you don’t go far. I feel that we have made progress.”The Gunners’ form in the first half of the season was patchy by comparison, and Wenger cited a lack of preparation time before the season as a defining factor in their ultimately feeble title bid.He said: “Not all of these players were available at the start of the season. Many came back with problems after the World Cup.“We maybe found a better balance between going forward and defending in the second half of the season.”last_img read more

Simi Valley Calendar

first_imgStep Aerobics, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at the Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave. Fee: $5, or $25 a month. Call (805) 584-4456. Jazzercise Aerobics, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at the Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave. Fee: $5, or $25 a month. Call (805) 584-4456. Alternative Recreation Program: Yoga Club, 6:45-7:45 p.m. at Houghton Park, 4333 Township Ave., Simi Valley. Parents can register and participate with their child. Monthly fee: $24. Call (805) 584-4400. New Hope for breast-cancer survivors, 7-8:30 p.m. at Simi Valley Senior Center, 3900 Avenida Simi. Free. Registration required. Call (805) 527-5360, Option 3. Aqua Fit, 7-8 p.m. at Rancho Simi Community Park pool, 1692 Sycamore Drive, Simi Valley. Call (805) 584-4400. Simi Peggers Cribbage Club, 7 p.m., at Simi Country Mobile Home Park Clubhouse, 1550 Rory Lane, Simi Valley. Call (805) 527-8164. Water Exercise, 7-8 p.m. at Rancho Simi Community Park pool, 1692 Sycamore Drive. Fee: $40. Call (805) 584-4400. Simi Valley Boots and Slippers Square Dance Club, 7:30-9:30 p.m. at Simi Valley Senior Center, 3900 Avenida Simi. Fee: $5. Lessons taught by Dick Hodnefield. Call (805) 583-3055 or e-mail sqdncrmn@pacbell.net. Deep Water Workout, 8-9 p.m. at the Rancho Simi Community Park pool, 1692 Sycamore Drive. Monthly fee: $45. Call (805) 584-4400. TUESDAY Family planning clinic, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at Ventura County Public Health, 660 E. Los Angeles Ave., Suite B2, Simi Valley. For an appointment, call (805) 578-3677. Jazzercise Aerobics, 9-10 a.m. and 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave. Fee: $5, or $25 a month. Call (805) 584-4456. Rotary of Simi Valley will meet at noon at Grand Vista Hotel, 999 Enchanted Way. Call (805) 583-4825. Videos in the Lounge, 1 p.m. at Simi Valley Senior Center, 3900 Avenida Simi. Call (805) 583-6363. Bowling, 4-5:30 p.m. at Brunswick Valley Bowl, 5255 Cochran St., Simi Valley. Fee: $5 per week. Call (805) 584-4400. Tuesday Evening Hike, 6:30, meet at the Long Canyon parking lot at Long Canyon Road and Wood Ranch Parkway. Call (805) 529-5581. Story time, 7 p.m. at Simi Valley Library, 2969 Tapo Canyon Road. Call (805) 526-1735. Simi Solos Toastmasters will meet, 7:30 p.m., Simi Valley YMCA, 3200 Cochran St. Call (805) 990-4950. Overeaters Anonymous, 8 p.m. at Church of Christ, 1554 Sinaloa Road, Simi Valley. Call (805) 581-4717 or (805) 529-8183. Open Gym Basketball, 6-9 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave., Simi Valley. Fee: $2, or $10 a month. Call (805) 584-4400. WEDNESDAY Swim and Stay Fit, 6-8 a.m. at the Rancho Simi Community Park pool, 1765 Royal Ave., Simi Valley. Fee: $40/month; 65 and older, $20/month. Call (805) 379-2378. Kiwanis Club of Simi Valley will meet, 7 a.m. at Marie Callender’s, 20 W. Cochran St. Call (805) 526-4649. Chair Exercise, 8:30 a.m. at Moorpark Active Adult Center, 799 Moorpark Ave. Call (805) 529-6864, Ext. 261. Men’s Anger Management class, 7 p.m. at Cornerstone Counseling Center, 1633 Erringer Road, No. 203-B, Simi Valley. Call (805) 582-2619. CPR Update: Health Care Provider class!off!, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at Simi Valley Hospital, 2975 N. Sycamore Drive. Call (805) 955-6890. Tot Time story time, 11 a.m. at Borders Books and Music, 2910 Tapo Canyon Road, Simi Valley. For ages 2-5. Call (805) 526-2800. Step Aerobics, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at the Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave. Fee: $5, or $25 a month. Call (805) 584-4456. Action Parent and Teen Support Program, 6:30 p.m. at Apollo High School, 3150 School St., Simi Valley. Hotline: (800) 367-8336. Water Exercise, 7-8 p.m. at Rancho Simi Community Park pool, 1692 Sycamore Drive. Fee: $40. Call (805) 584-4400. Emotions Anonymous, 7:30-9 p.m. at United Methodist Church, Wood Room, 2394 Erringer Road, Simi Valley. Free. Call (805) 526-6231. Clutterers Anonymous will meet, 7:30-9 p.m., Simi Valley Presbyterian Church, 4832 Cochran St., Room 210. Call (805) 526-5475. Deep Water Workout, 8-9 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Park pool, 1692 Sycamore Drive. Monthly fee: $45. Call (805) 584-4400. Simi Valley Woman’s Club, monthly meeting, 11 a.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005 Los Angeles Ave. Call (805) 583-8272. THURSDAY Rotary Club of Simi Sunrise will meet, 7 a.m. at Grand Vista Hotel, 999 Enchanted Way, Simi Valley. Call (805) 520-4894. Jazzercise Aerobics, 9-10 a.m. and 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave. Fee: $5, or $25 a month. Call (805) 584-4456. Scrabble Group will meet, 9:30 a.m. at the Moorpark Active Adult Center, 799 Moorpark Ave. Call (805) 517-6261. Videos in the Lounge, 1 p.m. at Simi Valley Senior Center, 3900 Avenida Simi. Call (805) 583-6363. Reproductive health care clinic, 1:30-4:30 p.m. at Ventura County Public Health, 660 E. Los Angeles Ave., Suite B2, Simi Valley. Call (805) 578-3677. Tap for Fitness, 2:30-4 p.m. at Moorpark Active Adult Center, 799 Moorpark Ave. Call (805) 517-6261. Circuit Training, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave. Fee: $5, or $25 a month. Call (805) 584-4456. Thursday Evening Hike, 6 p.m. at the Chumash Trailhead. Call the Rancho Simi Recreation and Park District at (805) 584-4400. Open Gym Volleyball, 6-9 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave., Simi Valley. Fee: $2 or $10 a month. Call (805) 584-4400. Co-custody parenting class, 6 p.m. at Cornerstone Counseling Center, 1633 Erringer Road, No. 203-B, Simi Valley. Call (805) 582-2619. Simi Valley Toastmasters, 7:30 p.m. at Clarion Commons, 5300 E. Los Angeles Ave., Simi Valley. Call (805) 522-9591. FRIDAY Basic Training, 6-7 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave. Fee: $5, or $25 a month. Call (805) 584-4456. Open Gym Basketball, 6-9 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave., Simi Valley. Fee: $2, or $10 a month. Call (805) 584-4400. SATURDAY Jazzercise Aerobics, 8-9 a.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave., Fee: $5, or $25 a month. Call (805) 584-4456. Open Gym Basketball, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave., Simi Valley. Fee: $2, or $10 a month. Call (805) 584-4400. Calendar events must reach the Daily News one week before the Sunday on which they are to run. Items must be typewritten. Phone numbers must be attached for contact purposes. Mail to Simi Calendar, P.O. Box 4200, Woodland Hills, CA 91365-4200. Fax (805) 583-0880. For information call (805) 583-7602.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! TODAY Sunday evening hike, 5 p.m. at the Rocky Peak Trailhead at the end of Rocky Peak Road off Santa Susana Pass. Call (805) 584-4400. MONDAY Swim and Stay Fit, 6-8 a.m. at the Rancho Simi Community Park pool, 1765 Royal Ave., Simi Valley. Monthly fee: $40, or $20 for 65 and older. Call (805) 379-2378. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2Power Walking, 8-9 a.m. at the Sycamore Drive Community Center, 1692 Sycamore Drive, Room B1, Simi Valley. Monthly fee: $30. Call (805) 584-4400. Muscle Sculpting, 9:30-10:30 a.m. at the Sycamore Drive Community Center, 1692 Sycamore Drive, Room B1, Simi Valley. Call (805) 584-4400. Women’s Anger Management class, 7:30 p.m. at Cornerstone Counseling Center, 1633 Erringer Road, No. 203-B, Simi Valley. Call (805) 582-2619. Studio Art Workshop, 9:30-11:30 a.m. at Moorpark Active Adult Center, 799 Moorpark Ave. Call (805) 517-6261. Open Gym Basketball, 1:30-6:30 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave., Simi Valley. Fee: $2, or $10 a month. Call (805) 584-4400. last_img read more

Sprint Educational Supplies to rise from the ashes with new store

first_imgSprint Education Supplies is back in business – just in time to meet the need of parents planning ahead for the latest book lists and school needs.There was genuine sadness when the store closed around a month ago.Through its previous owners, Sprint had developed an outstanding reputation for meetings its customers’ needs at both its Letterkenny and Donegal Town outlets. But now the stores are back and the great news is that most of the same friendly and helpful staff are there too.The Donegal Town remains at the Glebe Shopping Centre while the Letterkenny Store will open at 5 Lower Main Street in what was the previous Gallagher Menswear shop.Both stores will re-open next Monday, May 20th and there will be a host of in-store opening offers to suit everyone.Once again Sprint will specialise in school books, stationery, educational supplies, ink cartridges, toys, games and of course, arts and crafts. A spokesman for Sprint said they are really looking forward to picking up where the previous owners left off and putting their own new touch to the business.“We have lots of new plans but we want people to know that the same staff will be here bringing their expertise over many years.“We are opening in times for people to get their school book lists sorted and put out of the way for the new school year in September.“And the good news is that we’ll have plenty of special offers when we open,” said the spokesperson.Sprint Educational Supplies to rise from the ashes with new store was last modified: May 17th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Donegal TownletterkennyNewSprint Educational SuppliesStorelast_img read more

New Cambrian Fossil Quarry Beats Burgess Shale

first_img(Visited 55 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 A new outcrop of the Burgess Shale formation in Canada appears to be richer and more diverse than the original.Live Science calls it a Mother Lode – a new outcrop of Cambrian fossils in Kootenay National Park, Canada, that is revealing more species in more detail than the famous Burgess Shale, a World Heritage site.  It’s about 26 miles southeast of the Burgess site in Yoho National Park.  Already, researchers have found 3,000 fossils of 55 species, 15 of which are new to science, the article says (a photo gallery shows some of the specimens).  The rate they’re finding new fossils is “astonishing,” diggers say.  They are keeping the location of the “Marble Canyon” site secret to prevent looting.The find is published in Nature Communications, which states: “The presence of the stem arthropods Misszhouia and Primicaris, previously known only from the early Cambrian of China, suggests that the palaeogeographic ranges and longevity of Burgess Shale taxa may be underestimated.”The preservation appears to be even better than at Burgess.  The article describe the soft tissue impressions:Many of the fossils at the new site are better preserved than their quarry counterparts, the researchers report. The new fossils reveal the internal organs of several different arthropods, the most common type of animal in both the new and old Burgess Shale locations. Retinas, corneas, neural tissue, guts and even a possible heart and liver were found.“This is the first time we’re seeing these details,” Gaines said.Some surprises include: (1) Finding similar fossils to the Chinese ones at Chengjiang that were thought to have gone extinct 10 million years earlier.  “Until now, researchers thought these Cambrian animals went extinct by the time the Burgess Shale formed.  Their discovery in Canada means that many Cambrian life forms were more widespread and longer-lived than previously thought,” the article states.  (2) There are fewer sessile marine fossils at the new site, which researchers think is 100,000 years younger than Burgess.  (3) The rocks at Marble Canyon have a different lithology than at Burgess.Contorted strata in Kootenay National ParkThe article mentions the Cambrian explosion but none of the problems, explaining away the invention of new body plans with complex organs (“retinas, corneas, neural tissue, guts and even a possible heart and liver”) with a quick reference to hard parts to cover the hard parts of this embarrassing conundrum for Darwinian evolution:Other arthropods developed hard parts, such as shells, to protect themselves from their fellow predators. This “arms race” between predator and prey is one of the drivers of the Cambrian explosion, scientists think.Some scientists think otherwise: including Stephen Meyer, whose best-selling book Darwin’s Doubt not only dismissed Darwinian evolution, but explained how intelligent design is the only cause sufficient to produce new body plans.So these dumb animals “developed” hard parts.  Right.  They did it “to protect themselves.”  They met in war rooms to discuss plans for their “arms race.”  They “drove” evolution.  This is all the fallacy of personification.  It won’t work for a theory that champions unplanned, unguided, aimless, blind natural processes.  Read Darwin’s Doubt, and watch the Illustra documentary Darwin’s Dilemma.This discovery spells trouble not only for Darwinian evolution, but for old-earth creationism.  Notice how the evolutionists toss around millions of years recklessly; 100,000 years between the Burgess and Marble Canyon outcrops, 10 million years earlier for the Chinese site – yet they all have basically the same creatures in the same habitats.  Do they know these dates?  No!  It’s all made up to fit their made-up evolutionary timescale, that is crumbling anyway under the Cambrian explosion.  If we can’t trust them with that, why should we trust them with dating?  It’s like dealing with known liars.  You can’t trust anything else they say.  Theistic evolutionists and old earthers should consider the source of their trust in those dates.What this also means is that these outcrops are just the tip of the iceberg.  The same fossils in the same strata from Canada to China – think of it!  Something happened to them that prevented the normal process of decay when animals die.  They were all buried so quickly, even their corneas and hearts were preserved.  What could do that?  Hint: it was global, and it took one year, not 10 million.Evolutionists have wiped out.  Stop trusting their Darwine-inebriated notions.  Let the evidence speak for itself – outside the Darwin box.last_img read more